Soros foundation closes office in Hungary over anti-Soros bill

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According to reports, George Soros' Open Society Foundations will close their office in the Hungarian capital and move to Berlin.

"The decision to move operations out of Budapest comes as the Hungarian government prepares to impose further restrictions on non-governmental organizations through what it has branded its "Stop Soros" package of legislation", it continued.

Viktor Orban delivers his speech after took his oath as Prime Minister of Hungary during the plenary session of the new Hungarian Parliament in Budap.

When news of the Open Society Foundations' possible departure from Hungary broke in April, Orban said: "You might understand if I don't cry my eyes out".

"The government of Hungary has denigrated and misrepresented our work and repressed civil society for the sake of political gain, using tactics unprecedented in the history of the European Union", said Patrick Gaspard, president of the Open Society Foundations, reported CNBC.

A loose-knit group of George Soros-financed foundations is leaving Hungary as the government's nationalist leader continues cracking down on the billionaire's influence in the country. He has proposed what is commonly referred to as a "Stop Soros" law, aimed at penalizing nongovernmental agencies that assist asylum seekers and refugees.

North and South Korea groups unite at desk tennis world championships
The South Korean players are: Jeon Ji-hee, Kim Ji-ho, Suh Hyo-won, Yang Ha-eun and Yoo Eun-chong. North Korea boycotted the 1986 Asian Games and the 1988 Olympics, both held in Seoul.

In recent years, the fiercely anti-immigration Orban has waged a series of large-scale taxpayer-funded information campaigns attacking Soros, accusing him of being a "public enemy" plotting to change the cultural fabric of Europe.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban has blamed Soros, a Hungarian-born USA financier, for a host of ills and is planning to tighten a crackdown on non-governmental organisations (NGOs) under legislation dubbed the "Stop Soros" bill.

Note that Orban is a big critic of Soros. Soros, 87, a Jew who survived the Nazi occupation of Budapest during World War II, later made a fortune in the financial markets, and he created the foundations and donated billions of dollars to them.

The Open Society Foundations have a long legacy in Hungary, where Soros was born and where he began his philanthropy in Europe.

OSF cited the safety of its more than 100 employees in Hungary as well as the security of its operations there, which fund dozens of NGOs in the country of 10 million.

With Open Society deciding to leave, Jarabik said Orban has now achieved one of his primary goals of forcing out political foes. "The will of the people is going to rule the political arena".

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