Nikol Pashinyan is the only candidate for PM

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"We must form a government based on tomorrow's voting (on prime minister at the parliament)".

More than two weeks of anti-government protests forced the resignation of Republican Party veteran Serzh Sarksyan as prime minister and the party has said it will not put forward one of its own members to replace him, in a bid to calm tensions. "The National Assembly shall elect the Prime Minister by majority of votes of the total number of Deputies".

Note that the extension was agreed at today's meeting of the faction members with Pashinyan. All three parties have now declared support for Pashinyan's candidacy.

The deadline for parliamentary factions to nominate their candidates ran out at 18:00 on Monday.

Nikol Pashinyan, who had been leading anti-governmental protests, believes that "the recent events in the country will further strengthen Armenia's position in the negotiations on the Karabakh conflict settlement".

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"I think this is a unique and great opportunity to resolve the domestic political crisis and to register the victory of the people, the kind of victory in which there are no losers", Pashinyan, a former journalist turned lawmaker, said. The protesters are carrying national flags and chanting slogans.

He pledged to do no "personnel purges" if he was elected prime minister. Since 13 April, tens of thousands have come out to the streets daily in what Pashinyan has called a "velvet revolution".

The announcement coincided with the resumption of protests in the capital Yerevan after a two-day moratorium during which demonstrations against the Republican Party and official corruption were held in smaller cities.

OSCE observers noted that the previous parliamentary elections, in 2017, were "tainted by credible information about vote-buying, and pressure on civil servants and employees of private companies".

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