SES says used rocket ready for second lift off

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Out of 13 attempts, eight of the rockets have stuck the touchdown. After deploying SES-10, SpaceX plans on landing the core again. Assuming the rocket doesn't become a museum piece after that, maybe we'll see it fly again. Then, the rocket was refurbished to be prepared for the next mission. The first rocket that was recovered is a huge source of pride and is now installed in front of the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, California.

The customer flying on this first "flight-proven" rocket is SES, a satellite operator based out of Luxembourg.

The SES satellite taking flight this week will enhance coverage for Latin America.

A rendering of the SES-10 satellite on-screen. It will represent the first time the company has done so.

On Thursday, for the first time, the private spaceflight company will attempt to reuse a previously flown rocket booster to deliver a satellite to orbit.

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KTVU-TV reports Monday (http://bit.ly/2nXPIV7) that it is unclear if people are inside the three-story residential building. Oakland fire crews say they do believe there was a fatality in the fire but they will have to confirm that information.

"We believe reusable rockets will open up a new era of spaceflight, and make access to space more efficient in terms of cost and manifest management". It'll be interesting to see how this rocket fares after its second launch. The rocket successfully managed to return and land, whilst the Dragon Capsule it was carrying returned to Earth last week after being loaded up with data and equipment from the astronauts on board the ISS.

"Targeting Thursday, March 30 for Falcon 9 launch of SES-10".

The more frequently SpaceX can reuse its Falcon 9s, the greater the economic benefit to the company. If the rocket is able to launch without any problems, it would revolutionize the space industry, and make the process behind organizing launches not only cheaper but a lot easier. The ability to re-use Space's boosters promise to dramatically lower the cost of sending payloads to space. The short ignition of the nine Merlin 1D main engines of Falcon 9 spaceship happened after the launch team at SpaceX prepared the launcher, fueling it with supplies of chilled and dense RP-1 liquid oxygen and kerosene propellants.

If you're willing to ride on a "flight-proven" rocket, as SpaceX calls it, President and COO Gwynne Shotwell said you might get another 10 percent off.

The launch from the Kennedy Space Center in the USA state of Florida will be the first with a reused Falcon 9 booster stage that was recovered from a previous flight, media reported. Technicians will have to examine the results from the tests before giving a final all-clear, but the launch window opens at 6 p.m. EDT (2200 GMT) Thursday and extends for two-and-a-half hours.

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